Category Archives: simple and easy dishes – spring

Watercress

  1. Watercress & chicken stir-fry | BBC Good Food

    http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/…/watercress-and-chicken-s…
    Rating: 4.8 – ‎60 votes – ‎25 mins – ‎323 cal

    You won’t need packet sauces for Chinese meals, use this recipe from BBC Good Food.

  2. Tofu & Watercress | Easy Chinese Stir Fry Recipe – YouTube

    Apr 17, 2012 – Uploaded by VanessaFitnessTV

    Visit : http://www.vanessafitness.com This Chinese stir fry recipe is vegetarian but you can use chicken

  3. Wilted Watercress with Garlic Recipe | Epicurious.com

    Find the recipe for Wilted Watercress with Garlic and other garlic recipes at This tastes just like the garlic watercress dish you find in Chinese restaurants.

  4. Chinese Watercress Soup Recipe with Fish and Fresh Ginger

    chinesefood.about.com/…/chinesesouprecipes/…

    About.com
    Rating: 4 – ‎1 review – ‎20 mins

    Watercress Soup – This popular Chinese soup is loaded with nutritional benefits.

  5. Watercress with Rice Wine-Oyster Sauce Recipe | Eating Well

    http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/watercress_with_rice_wine_oy…
    Rating: 3 – ‎3 votes – ‎20 mins – ‎104 cal

    Traditional Chinese cooks love to stir-fry watercress year-round; use a salad spinner so the watercress is dry to the touch, or a stir-fry becomes a b.

  6. Watercress Soup Recipe – Noob Cook Recipes

    http://www.noobcook.com/watercress-with-pork-ribs-soup/

    Very simple recipe for Chinese-style watercress soup cooked with pork bones, red dates and wolfberries.

  7. Chinese Watercress Recipes | Yummly

    http://www.yummly.com/recipes/chinesewatercress

    Find Quick & Easy chinese watercress Recipes! Choose from over 47 chinese watercress recipes from sites like Epicurious and Allrecipes.

  8. Images for Watercress Chinese recipes

     – Report images

  9. Chinese Pork And Watercress Soup Recipe – Food.com – 508607

    20 mins – ‎131.5 cal

    Oct 30, 2013 – 1001 Low Fat Recipes Serves 6. Soup Recipe. Lost? Site Map. http://www.food.com/recipe/chinese-pork-and-watercress-soup-508607 

  10. Chicken And Watercress Soup RecipeChinese.Food.com – 15612

    chinese.food.com/recipe/chicken-and-watercress-soup-15612
    Rating: 4.5 – ‎3 reviews – ‎20 mins – ‎287.1 cal

    Dec 11, 2001 – Chinese believe that watercress are good for removing heatiness. If you are taking the soup for this purpose, do not add in the sesame oil.

  11. The Little Teochew: Singapore Home Cooking: Watercress Soup

    Sep 19, 2009 – 1 handful Chinese wolfberries – 3 large soup bowls of water (boiled till amount is reduced to about 2 large bowls) 1. Rinse watercress 

http://straightbamboo.com/articles/how-to-stay-healthy-in-spring/

Watercress is a spring food that builds yin and blood. To assist blood flow eat plenty of leafy greens, Chinese red dates, beans, peanuts and a small amount of liver and red meat.

spring is the time for energy to float up and anything heavy, such as oil or rich foods, weigh us down and make it very difficult for the energy to move up. A simple diet of cooked vegetables, grains and legumes can assist to gradually clear these symptoms. Specific foods that will speed up the process include lemons, limes, turmeric, parsnips, radishes, linseed oil, chamomile tea and seaweed.

So what to eat in spring?

Foods that eliminate Wind getting the energy up and moving. They support Liver yin, calm Liver yang, remove heat and stagnation from the Liver and support the Spleen.

In general, foods that are good for spring are warm and ascending sweet foods. In early spring, try cabbage, sweet potato, carrot and beetroot. As the weather changes, move to mint, sweet rice, shitake mushrooms, peas, sunflower seeds, pine nuts and in late spring, cherries.

Mung beans, green peas and green beans are colour coordinated to enliven the spirit of spring. They also remove heat, which can be very beneficial for many people during spring.

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Watercress – spring food – builds yin and blood

Spring Lifestyle

The energy of Spring is expansive and outward moving. It is time to start exercising and sweating more. Begin cooking and eating lighter meals. In wintertime we would tend to bake our food to more deeply warm our bodies. In the Spring steaming and stir-frying is more appropriate. It is beneficial to eat more leafy greens (kale, dandelion, collards, mint).

The sour flavor incorporated into the diet will help to balance the liver energy. Try to be conscious to include good oils into your meals (flax oil, sesame oil, olive oil). It is best to add these oils to already cooked food to preserve the quality. Eat what is locally grown and in season, as much as possible. It is important to be emotionally calm when eating, as well as to breathe deeply and thoroughly chewing our food. Drink lots of fluids (lemon can be added to water). The Spring is a great time of year to receive bodywork or acupuncture, in order to to facilitate the body in opening and relaxing.

Do your best to avoid toxicity in your foods and environment. Some things to avoid are: chemicals, drugs and alcohol; as well as refined sugars, processed foods, caffeine, large portions of meat, greasy and rich foods. Avoid stress! All of these are toxicities can impact and congest the liver.

Liver Patterns

When the liver energy is in balance we are able to make decisions and follow through with our creative visions. This is a great time of year to begin new projects. When the liver energy is deficient we may lack the ability to make decisions or follow through with them. On the contrary, when this energy is excessive we may become “work-aholics,” so determined to accomplish our goals that we neglect our needs or our personal relationships.

Physically, this is a time to assess the health of our nails, tendons and eyes. Nails should be strong and smooth with good color; not brittle or grooved. Tendons should be supple, flexible and strong. The eyes should be clear and bright, without yellow or red in the whites. Emotionally we can assess our health by witnessing if we are able to express our emotions in a healthy way, especially anger.

Spring Treatment

When spring arises, if you begin to feel out of balance, it may be a good time to seek a Chinese Medicine treatment. A person may experience a variety of symptoms, such as: foggy thinking or forgetfulness; tendon tightness; blurry, red, or dry eyes; lethargy; dry skin, skin itch, or rash. In addition, a person can have rib-side pain (especially after eating while emotional), abdomen distention, diarrhea, or constipation. Emotionally the imbalance can often come as outbursts of anger or increased frustration.

Through harmonizing with the springs energy we begin to feel energized, light and open. With tendons supple and strong we can move easily through our day. With eyes clear and bright we can appreciate the beauty of spring. Enjoy your health and clarity this spring!